Why does Google Keep Calling My Business?

November 24, 2017 on Local Search Marketing Blog by Jeffrey Magner

Is Google using RoboCalls to spam my phone number?

Many business owners get confused due to the repeated Spam calls to their business phone number from people claiming to be a representative from Google offering all sorts of scams. Here’s a list.

Robocall scams are automated phone calls using recorded messages that may ask you to press a button to speak to a sales rep. Google doesn’t make these calls, so if it’s not a real person right from the start (and you didn’t request an automated call from Google), it’s not Google.

It’s not Google that’s calling your business!

Unfortunately these calls are coming from scammers posing as legitimate agencies whose business model is to rip off business owners. The scammers offering to help you with your google listing or rankings has created the very ugly side of SEO (and a well-deserved sense of distrust in the industry).

When might Google contact you?

You may receive a phone call from Google to verify your business or confirm business details for Google Maps or Google My Business. You may also receive a phone call about Google AdWords, Google Play or other Google products. Unless you specifically requested an automated call, a call from Google will always be from a live person, not a recorded voice. Any emails from Google should come from an email address ending in “@google.com.” 

What can you do about it?

ALWAYS BLOCK THESE PHONE NUMBERS

You may find this annoying, as every week scammers seem to call from a different phone number. But just stick to it. Each spam call that comes in, just block the number. This is easy on a cell phone but also possible for any phone service. Eventually your efforts will pay off and these calls will stop.

REPORT THE SPAMMERS

This comes directly from Google:

Unfortunately, there are many unscrupulous individuals and companies who make these calls, even though they are breaking the law. Sometimes, robocalls falsely claim to be working “with Google” or “for Google” in an attempt to sell different schemes and online marketing services to unsuspecting individuals and companies.

These types of robocalls calls are illegal under U.S. law (unless you have given permission to receive them), and Google is never behind them.

Here’s what to do if you receive an unwanted automated robocall:

Hang up.

If you receive an unwanted robocall from a recorded voice claiming to be Google or working with Google, hang up immediately. Do not press any key even if the voice recording prompts you to in order to speak with a live person or to be taken off the call list. Pressing a key may mean you will receive more unwanted calls.

Prevent unwanted calls.

The Federal Trade Commission has established a Robocalls resources website with additional information about robocalls and steps you can take if you receive one.

Take steps to protect yourself in the future from these types of situations:

  • Check out the FTC’s tips on how to handle unwanted calls.
  • Check with your phone company to see if they can block calls from any problematic numbers.
  • Register your personal number with the National Do Not Call Registry at: www.donotcall.gov/register/reg.aspx or call 1-888-382-1222.

Report suspicious calls.

If you continue to receive unwanted calls, you can submit a complaint to the Federal Trade Commission. Go to: www.donotcall.gov or call 1-888-382-1222 to file a formal complaint. You can also submit a complaint to the Federal Communications Commission. Click here to file a formal complaint.

Google understands that these types of calls can be very bothersome—our own employees, their friends, and their families are often on the receiving end, too. We are actively working to try to put a stop to these calls. However, this isn’t always within our control; for example, callers may use untraceable phone numbers.

Help us track robocalls that falsely associate themselves with Google. Contact us directly via this webform and include the following information:

  • The caller’s company and contact information
  • Any emails or documentation received from the caller as part of a follow-up
  • Any additional information about the call

 

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